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WELCOME ...
Norris Shelton underwent a racial awakening that took him on a journey seeking his true ethnic identity. This experience, he reports, allowed him to view America without the normal prejudices the average American has inherited. His journey took him to the very depths of American consciousness. Scrutinizing true American history, he determined there is an ongoing injustice in America, an atrocious crime that is being covered up. He asked himself: Should this injustice be allowed to continue? If so, why? What is the justification? Why is such obvious inequality in a country that boasts of freedom for all allowed to continue?
When he tried to explain his findings, even to his closest associates, he discovered that, because of bigotry, fear and shame, his summation was far too enigmatic for the average American, black or white, to fully appreciate.

 

THE VISION ...
Even though diverse ethnic groups reside in America, he realized that talking openly about racial issues is an unwelcome area of discussion. However, a racial breakthrough of this magnitude (the disregarded history of the American Slaves and the continuing journey of their descendants) is far too important not to be shared and expounded upon. This heretofore overlooked hypothesis could advance an entire nation of abused people and shouldn't stay covered up. Consequently, he realized it would take in-depth writing to explain what he has uncovered and felt duty-bound to spell out and share his findings.
"America's Little Black Book," is an examination of the very foundation of one of America's largest ethnic entities. It may well become the "American Slaves' Bible."


THE CHALLENGE ...
Here are some defining questions he was faced with when first contemplating this work: What purpose does the cover up of slavery serve other than to deny justice to the descendants of those who helped build our great country? Why does America celebrate "Black History Month" and not "American Slave History Month?" The act of slavery was an atrocious act that still affects the descendants of slaves. Why isn't it more freely discussed? Why are so many Americans afraid of the facts of slavery? Since America sings of the "land of the free and the home of the brave," why would proud Americans fear correcting such an atrocious act that was committed against humanity?
Shelton found that
the average American would rather not deal with the ugliness of slavery; that it is easier to let slavery and the descendants of slaves stay cloaked in obscurity. Most Americans who have a voice in government, and who proclaim to be honorable, would rather be politically correct than be fair or honorable. They would rather not take a chance on disturbing their individual power bases.

HIS REALIZATION AND RESPONSE ...
Those who have wealth, power and the wherewithal to bring this horrible injustice out into the open have gotten used to America being a prejudiced country; could it be they simply would rather not complicate their luxurious lifestyles by helping those who are being abused? The truth is: Far from a benign neglect, America has developed a malignant indifference toward the inherited injustices that stem from slavery, even though the aftereffects of slavery still plague our homeland. Enduring the intolerable has become a way of life for too many of us.
The author searched until he found a way to assist the descendants of American Slaves in achieving a revitalization of their quest for true freedom, a renewal of the dream of an entire people. His newly published book, America's Little Black Book, recalls those human beings who were bred in America to be slaves, examines the persistent aftereffects of slavery and paves the way for a racial-relations breakthrough

 

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Black High School Students Convene on U of L Campus!

The University of Louisville Minority Teacher Recruitment Project and American Slaves, Inc. hosted the Black High School Educational Summit, May 15 & 16, 2009, on the U of L Campus. Subject matter of the summit embraced
concepts from

 America's Little Black Book.

Click  here for details!

Click on the camera above or right here for a sneak preview of photos from that event.

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